Drewbot

Apr 18

Plan of New York, 1661 (Via The British Library)

Plan of New York, 1661 (Via The British Library)

Interior of a church wrecked by German shells in Richebourg, France, photographed by H. D. Girdwood in 1915. (Via The British Library)

Interior of a church wrecked by German shells in Richebourg, France, photographed by H. D. Girdwood in 1915. (Via The British Library)

Apr 17

Apr 13

Apr 12

“These children are not the ones giving adults much trouble, so they’re easy to miss. They’re the daydreamy ones, the ones with work that’s not turned in, leaving names off of papers or skipping questions, things like that, that impinge on grades or performance. So anything we can do to understand what’s going on with these kids is a good thing.” —

Dr. Keith McBurnett, a professor of psychiatry at UCSF, describing “sluggish cognitive tempo”, the newest en vogue ‘diagnosis’.

"What’s going on" is creativity and exploration. If we vanquish these things in pursuit of turning in structured papers on time we’ll commit a very grave error that will haunt us in generations to come.

Three thoughts:

(Via NYTimes.com)

This is my favorite part about how we make predictions: people make accurate specific predictions but completely blow the context.

Here, the author accurately predicts that computers will eventually shrink to a size where it’s practical to wear them on our wrists. But they completely miss wireless communication and non-QWERT interfaces.

In drawn out prediction work, the cultural context is adorably off. It’s a Jetson’s like future where cars fly and robots clean the house but it’s still a nuclear family with only the husband working, traffic jams, and the 9-to-5 commute.

My favorite example of this is in 2001, where Arthur C. Clarke imagines offices on the Moon, complete with a typing pool of female secretaries.

This is my favorite part about how we make predictions: people make accurate specific predictions but completely blow the context.

Here, the author accurately predicts that computers will eventually shrink to a size where it’s practical to wear them on our wrists. But they completely miss wireless communication and non-QWERT interfaces.

In drawn out prediction work, the cultural context is adorably off. It’s a Jetson’s like future where cars fly and robots clean the house but it’s still a nuclear family with only the husband working, traffic jams, and the 9-to-5 commute.

My favorite example of this is in 2001, where Arthur C. Clarke imagines offices on the Moon, complete with a typing pool of female secretaries.

Apr 10

The view from the hotel.

The view from the hotel.

"The nondescript meeting room in which Steve Jobs, Greg Christie, and others discussed the first iPhone prototypes."

It looks like they just put all the stuff on the table they wanted to jam into a single device. (via Ars Technica)

"The nondescript meeting room in which Steve Jobs, Greg Christie, and others discussed the first iPhone prototypes."

It looks like they just put all the stuff on the table they wanted to jam into a single device. (via Ars Technica)